Cape Town Calling
    R75.00 inc. VAT

    From Paul Theroux and Peter Moore to Jonny Steinberg, JM Coetzee, Jonathan Kaplan, Nelson Mandela, Mamphela Ramphele, Tom Eaton, Breyten Breytenbach, Pieter-Dirk Uys and Gabeba Baderoon: Discover Cape Town with top contemporary authors – both well-loved locals and international travel writers. Selected and with an introduction by Justin Fox.

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    District Six Revisited
    R315.00 inc. VAT

    In the varied architectural landscape of District Six in Cape Town lived a close-knit community of artists, musicians, writers, politicians, priests, sheikhs, workers, gangsters, sportsmen, housewives and business people. There were restaurants, grocery stores, butchers, tailor shops, drapers and a large fish market offering a wide selection of sea produce at very reasonable prices. In this colourful mix of humanity, there were always the delightful sounds of children playing in the streets. When, in February 1966, the National Party government announced that District Six was to be razed to the ground in order to make space for a new “white area,” the poet James Matthews suggested to George Hallett and Clarence Coulson that they photograph the area before the bulldozers came in. As young students of photography they produced an intimate portrait of District Six under the guidance of Peter Clarke and Sakkie Misbach, who also provided Hallett with film for the project. In the 1960s Jackie Heyns ran a weekly column in the Golden City Post called “Aunt Sammy’s,” which he illustrated with his own photographs. The columns—three of which are reproduced in the book—were based on the real Aunty Sammy, a shebeen owner living in District Six with her white husband and a rich source of local stories. Gavin Jantjes was a student at Michaelis Art School who lived in District Six with his parents; his pictures were taken during his wanderings in the area. Finally Wilfred Paulse, a free-lance photographer, covered the district shortly before its destruction, along with the bleak new developments on the Cape Flats where most of the inhabitants ended up against their will. District Six Revisited is set to become the definitive collection of photographs of this vibrant suburb, whose destruction became a symbol of the cruelty and inhumanity suffered by the people of this country. It attempts to reconstruct the spirit of the place from important historic photographs, some of which are published here for the first time.

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    Echo Location – A Guide to Sea Point for Residents and Visitors
    R240.00 inc. VAT

    Never overburdened by earnestness, this guide to Sea Point for Residents and Visitors takes a good look at the hard questions by means of great entertainment.

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    Hidden Cape Town
    R400.00 inc. VAT

    A unique look inside 30 of Cape Town’s most notable buildings. If you have ever wondered what lies behind an interesting facade, or wished you could peek behind a closed door, Hidden Cape Town is the book for you.

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    Keeping Time: 1964 – 1974 The Photographs and Cape Town Jazz Recordings of Ian Bruce Huntley
    R700.00 inc. VAT

    This book celebrates the public emergence of an extraordinary visual and audio archive that was initiated by Ian Bruce Huntley in Cape Town fifty years ago. In addition to a biographical sketch of Ian Huntley, the book offers a substantial essay by Jonathan Eato as well as a full discography of all the recordings by Huntley.

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    Movement Cape Town
    R350.00 inc. VAT

    Movement Cape Town provides insights by top urban researchers, academics, designers, artists and activists who are creating, shaping and observing the movements that have made Cape Town the city it is today.

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    Undercity – The Other Cape Town
    R1,200.00 inc. VAT

    The South African photographer David Lurie unmasks the “other” Cape Town, in the early morning hours, when the city is still asleep, delicate and vulnerable. His series Morning After Dark deals with the infrastructure of public and private places and its influence on the city’s residents—from rich to poor.

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